Sunday, November 23, 2014
   
Welcome to the Infant Cognition Group
Department of Psychology, Queen's University

The Infant Cognition Group studies how infants and young children perceive and reason about the world around them. More specifically, our studies explore such topics as how infants and children discriminate animate from inanimate objects, how they interpret the behaviour of others, how they evaluate and engage in prosocial behaviour, and how they come to understand artifacts such as tools and maps.

Our team consists of Dr. Valerie Kuhlmeier and an energetic group of graduate and undergraduate students, laboratory assistants, and research interns. On our website you can meet the research team, learn about our ongoing studies, download our publications and presentations, and find out how to participate. Also, you will find links to our collaborators and other sites of interest.

Enjoy your visit!
Recent Publications
Olmstead, M.C., & Kuhlmeier, V.A. (in press). Comparative Cognition. Cambridge University Press.     Rutherford, M.D., & Kuhlmeier, V.A. (2013). Social Perception.  MIT/Bradford Press.
 

Robson, S.J., Lee, V., Kuhlmeier, V.A., & Rutherford, M.D. (2014).  Infants use contextual contingency to guide their interpretation of others'
goal-directed behavior.
  Cognitive Development, 31, 69-78.

Dunfield, K.A. & Kuhlmeier, V.A. (2013).  Classifying prosocial behaviour: children’s responses to instrumental need, emotional distress, and material desire. Child Development, 84, 1766-1776.

Dunfield, K.A., Kuhlmeier, V.A., & Murphy, L. (2013) Children's use of communicative intent in the selection of cooperative partners. PLOS ONE, 8(4): e61804. [Click here for summary]

Lee, V. & Kuhlmeier, V.A. (2013).  Young children show a dissociation in looking and pointing behavior in falling events. Cognitive Development, 28, 21-30.

Sabbagh, M., Benson, J., & Kuhlmeier, V.A. (2013). False belief understanding in preschoolers and infants. In: M. Legerstee, D. Haley, and M. Bornstein (Eds.), The Infant Mind: Origins of the Social Brain, Guilford Press.

Dunfield, K.A., & Kuhlmeier, V.A. (2013). Evidence for partner choice in toddlers: Considering the breadth of other-oriented behaviours. Behavioral and Brain Sciences.

Kuhlmeier, V.A. (2013). Disposition attribution in infancy. In M. Banaji, & S. Gelmen (Eds.), Navigating the social world: What infants, chilldren, and other species can teach us.  Oxford University Press.

Kuhlmeier, V.A., & Robson, S.J.  (2012).  Diagnosing goal attribution: commentary on Hernik and Southgate.  Developmental Science, 15, 725-726.

Dunfield, K.A., Kuhlmeier, V.A., O’Connell, L., & Kelley, E.  (2011).  Examining the diversity of prosocial behavior: helping, sharing, and comforting in infancy. Infancy, 16(3), 227-247.

Information for Parents
The participants in our studies consist of parent and child volunteers who graciously offer their time and assistance. A visit takes about 45 minutes and is arranged at a time that is convenient for you. Our researchers are committed to making your visit a pleasant and fun learning experience.

Learn more on the Parents Page



The Child and Adolescent Development Group at Queen's is a group of labs that includes us (The Infant Cognition Group) You can visit the main site here, visit us on Facebook, or see our twitter feed below.


                                                                                
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